In 2016


In 2016, I participated in my first mock trial during my summer program study at Stanford Pre-Collegiate International Institutes. As the lead attorney for the defense, I fought over a commercial fraud case with my team. Our success did not only lead to us winning the jury but also me developing an interest in law.
The courses I take at school include Business, English literature and Economics. They best prepare me for studying law, as they allow me to acquire the essential skills, and hence become more capable of pursuing my academic interest.
Business, the intriguing nature of this subject nudged me into making my choice. I admire how this complex, challenging subject relates to all individuals’ well-being, and have special passion for studying external influences on business activity. Since taking Business at A-Level my interest has matured and I can now examine how legal changes may influence business behaviors, and the threats and opportunities it creates.
I won the Outstanding Cambridge Learner Awards for being top of China in the June 2017 Cambridge IGCSE English as a Second Language (Count-in Speaking) exam. I then moved on to English Literature to acquire knowledge of different communities’ major aspirations and concerns. Such perception helps me better understand law in all cultural contexts. I also take Economics to improve my understanding of the subject and simultaneously, develop problem-solving skills. By now I have obtained a disciplined approach to analyzing social issues, which prepares me for doing further study towards my passion.
One must be able to present persuasive arguments and think critically to study law. I am an active member of the school public forum debate society where I learned to manipulate evidence and to defend arguments. I had defeated contestants from across China and was a semi-finalist as well as an Outstanding Speaker in one of the nation’s most competitive tournaments. On the other hand, being a skilled public speaker, I have won championships while being ranked as top speakers in numerous competitions. I was later invited to take part in the Summer School for Effective Leadership at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. There I teamed up with students from different backgrounds to research social issues and present originated solutions. My group’s research took insights into local juveniles’ growing suicide rate, and we investigated into the possibility for the government to work with NGOs to improve the status. This experience introduced me to the conflicts between NGOs and the government, how they operate under legal constraints and their limitations. It also influenced me to become a more socially responsible person.
In order to better understand the daily pattern of legal workers, I worked as an apprentice at a private law firm during the summer. I dedicated my time and effort in attending different court trials, viewing numerous legal briefs, and collating case-relevant information and evidence. I remember sitting in the courtroom taking notes of a commercial dispute case between a large public sector firm and its former senior manager. That was when I started to become particularly fond of commercial law. Basing its roots in the lex mercatoria of the middle ages, how commercial law develops alongside human history fascinates me. The way it closely relates to all individuals’ well-being places great value on this specific field of study and led me to further investigate its flaws and limitations. After conducting personal observation and research, I found that the greatest challenge for most legal firms and systems nowadays derives from the implications of new technology, as well as the consequent ‘new’ approach to dispute resolution. The pace of technological change in our society has never been so dramatic, thus the courts now tend to look to patterns of judicial lawmaking in other legal systems for solutions to help resolve complex issues of legal policy. However, I believe that law has to be constantly cultivated and regularly renewed. For example, Common Law countries like Canada have been able to update their commercial law consistently, infusing the system with legal creativity which modernizes the industry. I also had discussions with my mentor to conclude the importance of regular reviews of the laws governing commercial contract transactions. That experience contributed to my idea of social justice in the business environment, and I came to realize the magnificent impact a lawyer could have on the outcome of a business case, as well as a person’s life.
Grew up being embraced by Hong Kong’s unique culture and strong spirit, I love how the city blends in global urbanity and local traditions, despite being a bustling metropolis. My father was an alumnus of the City University of Hong Kong and had raised me with the rigorous he inherited from his college life. I desire academic excellence, and CityU, as the first in Hong Kong to receive the QS 5-star Plus Award, is definitely my destination. The university’s dynamism and outstanding output in law make me believe that it is where I will achieve my aspiration towards social justice.
I highly value global vision, and hence find the Hong Kong Commercial and Maritime Law Centre fascinating. The center itself is the perfect demonstration of innovation in commercial law, which is the key to functioning in the modern world eco-system where laws systems are in flux. I admire this forward-looking nature of the university and would love to dedicate my effort and energy in this environment to forward my passion in international trade and information technology law.
Personally, I also consider CityU’s Go Global initiative very attractive. I am particularly interested in the exchange program with the Faculty of Law of Université de Montréal in Canada, which in my belief, will enhance my cultural competency and empower me with innovative capacities to take stronger positions in my future career in law.