To add more


To add more, Faustus ignores the many chances he has to repent and avoid eternal damnation, yet he decides to sway with his thrive of power and knowledge. Each time the character of Good and Evil Angels address Faustus, he manages to blow his chance of redemption in reference to his own decision over and over again of his rebuke of redemption. For example:
GOOD ANGEL. O Faustus, lay that damned book aside,
And gaze not on it, lest it tempt thy soul,
And heap God’s heavy wrath upon thy head!
Read, read the Scriptures. That is blasphemy. (1.1.72-75)
On the other hand, the Evil Angel tends to seduce Faustus with the powers he will receive form sorcery and the god-like status:
EVIL ANGEL. Be thou on earth as Jove is in the sky,
Lord and commander of these elements. (1.1.78-79)
Faustus’ imagination starts to wander with the word of the Evil Angel and tends to storm with all the powers and abilities he shall receive through black magic and to endure actions that no human being have already dreamed of. From the use of his new magical powers, Faustus actions are of his own mind of thoughts and inner desires.